Teach-the-Brain
   

FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Go Back   Teach-the-Brain > Teach-the-Brain > How the Brain Learns
Home Forums Info
Follow TeachtheBrain on Twitter  

Educators must be experts in teaching learning


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-09-2005, 09:26 PM   #101
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning.

Hi....No I have not read either of the books....might be fun.
Be well,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2005, 12:43 PM   #102
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning.

It may be time to review parts of the higher functions of the brain along with those area that keep us together. I have some very good URLs retrieved September 2, 2005 from the internet that may be a review for some of us, but important.
URL: http://science.howstuffworks.com/brain7.htm
URL: http://science.howstuffworks.com/brain8.htm
URL: http://science.howstuffworks.com/brain9.htm
URL: http://health.allrefer.com/pictures-...-system-1.html
Best,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2005, 05:06 PM   #103
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning

Educators must think twice when assessing student learning. We learned in our thread in teach-the- brain that memories are both declarative and nondeclarative. We knew that for a long time...it was just called explicit and implicit. Before that it was something else but that is not the point here.

When we assess declarative memory/learning we remember that it is formed differently than nondeclarative memory/learning and is retrieved differently. Declarative memory is conscious memory of facts, events, etc...and can be retrieved as needed. We can assess with pen and paper if we desire or in other ways but we can utilize these conscious memories for explanation orally or through writing etc. However nondeclarative memory and learning is a different story. It is unconscious memory and we cannot retrieve these memories and learning through usual means. The student's nondeclarative memory etc. is formed through practice and practice and cannot be retrieved for paper and pencil assessment. They must be assessed by demonstrating that they know how to do the task. Since examples of nondeclarative memory are swimming, driving a car, dancing, playing the piano, priming and so on. Remember the habituation of the Aplysia ...this was unconscious memory.
Just something to think about.
Best,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2005, 10:59 AM   #104
geodob
Junior Member
 
geodob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 10
Hi Rob, I found your message most interesting.
As I've been reflecting more and more on non-declarative/ implicit learning / memory.
Where I'm concluding that our Neural Processes are in fact non-declarative / implicit processes.
You write that implicit learning is retrieved differently. Though I would suggest that the very act of 'retrieval' is an implicit process.
Though it begins with the processes that support each of our Senses.
The way that each of us use our Vision, is a learnt implicit process.
As is our hearing, and all other senses.
We are not born with fully functioning Senses, but rather 'learn' how to utilise them. Which surely is implicit learning?
You wrote that implicit learning is formed through practise and practise and cannot be retrieved for paper and pencil assessment.
Though the very act of putting pen to paper/ writing, is a learnt implicit activity. Yet this is not limited to 'motor skills', as the processes that we use to take ideas and then express them. Are implicit processes.
For example, as I think of the words I am about to write, I 'sub-vocalise'/ hear them in my head. Where sub-vocalising is a learnt implicit activity.
The ability to associate a sound with a symbol is also a learnt neural process.
Though this involves the coordination of the brain's auditory and visual regions. Which surely is implicit?
Yet this raises the issue of whether the ability to integrate different brain regions is a learnt implicit process? Where I would note as an example, that I have helped a number of children and adults with lateralisation exercises to effectively develop left/ right brain coordination. Which becomes implicit.
As well as the Cerebellum and other regions.
Where the aim of the exercises is to develop implicit connectivity.

When Students are assessed for their Declarative recall of a subject.
If in fact, a Student attended all classes and read all of the books.
Aren't we actually assessing their ability to firstly process incoming sensory information. Then to store it for short term memory retrieval. Finally for long term memory retrieval. Which are all Implicit processes.
Which suggests that perhaps what is considered as a Declarative assessment of a Subject, is in fact primarily a Non-Declarative assessment?
An assessment of the neural processes associated with a particular Subject?
Where prior learning is the major variable, along with the method of instruction?
Though in conclusion, I come to the question of actually what is Declarative Learning?
Other than the end-product'?

To declare, or non-declare, that is the question?
Geoff.


geodob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2005, 08:42 PM   #105
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning

Hi.....I was very fortunate to be selected to be a presenter at a conference this week held at the Marriott Hotel in Irvine, California. I spoke of Cognitive Sciences for Adults.... and learned a great deal myself. I learned that it is extremely important to collaborate with scientists, neuroscientists, bioscientists, cognitive scientists, molecular biological scienctists of cognition...etc. etc.

We as educators need to streamline our educator/teacher jargon and so do the scientists, so that we can learn from each other in order to teach learning with causation...in this case the brain.

It is important that our students receive the correct knowledge with causation being foremost. Students are currently receiving brain information that is suspiciously not causal. Elementary level students are coming home with the wrong information and beginning to form neuronal networks that may in the future need adaptation.

I strongly recommend that we begin our reciprocal collaboration now. I belong to the International Society for the Mind, Brain, and Education as a charter member. I know many of the Societies Officers professionally. They are top notch. What ever you do...it is time to join with others, that being IMBES or other top notch organizations.
Best,
Rob

Website for the International Society of the Mind, Brain, and Education
URL: http://www.imbes.org/
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2005, 04:47 PM   #106
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning.

Educators must be experts in teaching learning...I started this thread in May 2005 [circa] and we have had over 2,000 responses to the thread. Maybe it is time to retire this thread and become more general in our topics. Opinions are very welcome?
Best,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2005, 04:56 PM   #107
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be expert in teaching learning.

We have had a wonderful response [this thread] since I started it in May 2005. [circa] Over 2000 have responded, but is it time to retire this thread and begin a more in-depth thread. Resonses are welcome.
Best,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-09-2005, 05:56 PM   #108
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning

Associative and Nonassociative learning....what is it?....Urls retrieved 9-14-05 from the internet.

URL:http://ifcsun1.ifisiol.unam.mx/Brain/learning.htm
URL: http://www.people.vcu.edu/~mikuleck/...sys/sld016.htm
URL: http://cpmcnet.columbia.edu/dept/phy...2/kandel1.html
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...&dopt=Citation


Best,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2005, 06:14 PM   #109
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning.

Hi....Ran across some very interesting learning at the confidence level. I retrieved the Urls from the internet September 16, 2005.
Enjoy,
Rob
URL: http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/nobel20.html
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-09-2005, 01:47 AM   #110
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning.

There is no stopping the person who wants to learn. Sound silly. Well, maybe it sounds silly but watch the person who really wants to learn. They will want to know first hand how this occur. They will want to know not only why but how? They will drive you crazy with questions then be silient. Maybe they can now learn more from others. Books, Book, articles, journals, interviews with people, interviews with disability, living with disability.....be part of the problem and be a bigger part of the solution. Real learners want to get to the issues quickly, but will take infinite time to understand a problem in-depth. Enjoy being challenged...and have a cause...what-ever that may be....Cares deeply about being correct....yet wants little or no credit for the answer.
Be well,
Rob
"If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away."
~Henry David Thoreau~
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-09-2005, 03:34 PM   #111
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning...

A number of years ago, I purchased The collected works of L.S. Vygotsky....and each time I read the volumes, it seems like I am reading it for the first time. The books are not changing...my brain is changing with the new knowledge becoming prior knowledge and the forming of neuronal networks.

It seems that books that I did not care for a few years ago are becoming much more interesting now. The books are not changing my brain is making a phyical change. I bought a great book on synaptic connections in 2002 and thought it was interesting but nothing special...I began reading it again last night and it really was like reading it for the first time. "Someone famous said that....I cannot remember who it is."

Well remember that your brain and your student's brain is physically changing and you just try reading some of your older books and see what I mean.

Something for us to remember....new learning becomes prior learning and prior learning is manifested in the brain as neuronal networks. The book is not getting easier....your prior knowledge is catching up with the book.
Be well,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-09-2005, 06:09 AM   #112
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning.

Hi,

I liked the thread on biologically learning. Cows gotta moo and chickens must try to lay eggs. etc. etc.
We know that in training olympic swimmers that we tend to not take their natural ability and form it to a certain predisposed mold from a text. Actually...[each Olympic medalist that swam for George Haines ...the Olympic swimming coach many times over] their own techniques were studied profoundly and we tried to apply their natural athletic ability to physics and if that did not thrown off their natural talent, we let them be and trained them for competitive swimming. Natural ability is great...don't mess with it.
Be well,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-09-2005, 06:38 PM   #113
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning...

Scopes trial...AGAIN????? URL retrieved from internet 9-27-05.

URL: http://www.eschoolnews.com/news/PFsh...ticleID =5878
Best,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-09-2005, 12:38 AM   #114
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning.

Hi....did you ever hear the word synesthesia....
Best, URL Retrieved from internet 9-28-05.
Rob URL:http://www.answers.com/synesthesia
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-09-2005, 08:01 PM   #115
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning...

Would anyone who know the answer to this question, please let me know....or send an url. Thank You....Rob
Question

Do glial cells support the synapse(s) by cleaning and removing debris as they do support the neurons?
Thank you,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2005, 05:33 PM   #116
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning.

Hi...
As you know...memory and learning go hand in hand. The video that is from the url retrieved from the internet, October 1, 2005 is of a serious memory deficit.
Have a nice weekend,
Rob
URL: http://www.learner.org/vod/vod_window.html?pid=1617
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2005, 07:53 PM   #117
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning..

Url retrieved Oct. 1, 2005 from the internet.
URL:Originally Posted by segarama
Multiple intelligences is very flexible and who knows Howard Gardner the founder of MI might any day add or secure more flexibility to multiple intelligences. He is brilliant and knows that we have self-efficacy in areas that may be arcane to the casual reader, but have worth and self-dignity until institutions of higher learner need quantatative data in the form of a score IQ 142 to arbitrarily obviate higher education for that person for this particular year. Subsequently, when financial times are good or bad the IQ becomes a predominate factor is drawing the line.

Give me a student excited about a subject and a disposition to match and the experiential learning that the student will encounter will be very uplifting and produce self-efficacy.
Best,
Rob


Hi...
Mutiple Intelligences is very important...please take time....plenty of time to hear this tape retrieved from the internet on September 26, 2005. [Genius] From the Infinite Mind....very good.
Best, URL:http://www.lcmedia.com/mind393.htm
Rob

Best,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2005, 01:47 AM   #118
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning...

Hi.... It is essential that we all who are interested in learning know about the HM amnesia of a young boy who was hit by a bicyle and hurt very badly. This case is the major amnesia case in the world today and all neuroscientists and those who take brain education seriously either know about this case because you cannot really understand memory and learning without it.

Dr. Larry Squire co-author of the text Memory:From minds to molecules and I discussed a little about the case a few weeks ago. It is major and he was very up to date and knew about it intimately. When we understand this case, we will have a better knowledge of memory and learning...and this is the neural substrate for most of it.
Be well,
Rob
URL: http://www.brainconnection.com/topic...n=fa/hm-memory
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-10-2005, 06:34 AM   #119
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning.

October 29, 2005

Hi, I must say with all the god given experience teaching children and adults that I have enjoyed immensely over a great wide geography of our world in addition to the similar experiences that those whom I have but the highest respect for on this earth would bear witness that we are only going to help children to learn who [we] bring into the fold and make them part of us and part of the group no matter how difficult the task or how difficult our position may be. This is the sole reason for teaching. [We] must do our very best to raise and foster resilience in our children and adults...but salient and most germane to my message is that the teacher and student cannot be working 5-7 hours a day today [together] without being reciprocally smoothered and expect the composure of saints. We continually add on to the curriculum....it is time to take a hard look at what we are doing and prioritize the most important parts of the curriculum and go much deeper. Children expecially are almost like little learning machines....they want to help; they want to learn; they want to be wanted; they want to love their fellow students....they love their teachers most of the time,yet somehow adults put a saddle on them and try to break them [figuratively] or mold them to comply. [This action on the part of adults and teacher] stifles the innate desire to learn and disposes of any neurobiological substrate that may exist. When you are training a great athlete, you take plenty of time to see what they have to offer before trying to make any changes in their natural ability. The same is true for students in the academics......
Be well,
Rob
P.S. Hope to be able to return to teach-the brain forum on a very limited basis. I am taking on some new resposibilities that are very time consuming and most challenging. Be well,
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-10-2005, 06:47 PM   #120
AnnaLCM
Brain Start
 
AnnaLCM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Cambridge, MA
Posts: 2
The Infinite Mind, a national, weekly public radio series focusing on the mind.

The Infinite Mind, is a national, weekly public radio series focusing on the art and science of the human mind, and the biology of human behavior. The program airs in more than 240 markets across the U.S. including such top 10 cities as New York, Washington, DC, Detroit, Atlanta and Boston, reaching more than one million listeners weekly. With more than 30 major broadcast awards, The Infinite Mind is public radio’s most honored and listened to health and science program.
You can Order The Infinite Mind for educational and classroom use including a one-hour audio CD and transcript. This educational package comes with the rights to use the programs for all educational and classroom uses. Visit www.theinfinitemind.com for more information and a complete listing of programs.
AnnaLCM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2005, 07:47 PM   #121
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning[neurogenesis in brain].

In today's San Diego Union Tribune dated November 2, 2005 Staff Writer Bruce Lieberman has written.

On the trail of neurons

Exactly how stem cells in the adult brain become neurons is a mystery. But scientists have now identified a molecule that appears to help trigger the change.
Fred Gage, of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in LaJolla, found that a protein called Wnt3 is critical to the proliferation of neurons in the brain.

Stem cells in the adult brain have the potential to mature in to many types cells. They include nerve cells calledneurons, and astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, the network of cells that support neurons.

The Wnt3 protein, secreted by astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, must be present for stem cells in the brain to proliferate into neurons, experiments in mice showed. In animals genetically engineered without the Wnt3 protein, the appearance of new neurons fell dramatically, Gage found.

In all mammals, neurons are generated in two small parts of the brain: the olfactory bulb, which processes odors, and the hippocampus, which is involved in forming memories and learning.

"No one knows why the brain would allow new neurons to be born throughout life in these restricted areas," said Gage. With knowledge of the Wnt3 protein, scientists may be able to explore why, he said.

The Salk study was published Oct. 27, 2005 in the journal Nature.
Be well,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2005, 07:22 PM   #122
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning and keeping up!!!!!!!!!!!

November 4, 2005
It is extremely important that educators and those in science work together to better deliver the best information for our students.

I was forturnate to hear Kenneth S. Kosik, M.D. speak at the LEARNING AND THE BRAIN CONFERENCE, October 26-29 held at the Harvard University Faculty Club and Hyatt Regency Cambridge, MA.

Dr. Kosik is the Co-Director, Neuroscience Research Institute, UCSB - and Director of Kosik Laboratory of Cellular Neurobiology at the Harvard Institute of Medicine. Please read his Welcoming letter:
Thank you,
Rob

_________________________ ___
WELCOME
Kenneth S. Kosik, M.D.
Harvard Medical School &
University of California, Santa Barbara

"Welcome to this online community. This membership site celebrates what seems all too obvious, but is often forgotten: educators and neuroscientists share a great many goals. Neuroscience is delving into realms that have pre-occupied educators for years, such as learning and memory, the emotional development of children, the basis of musical talent, bilingual experiences, and dyslexia to name only a few areas of mutual interest.

What emerges from the labs of brain scientists is the raw material that educators must evaluate carefully. Neuroscience data does not come with a how-to manual for the classroom, and so it falls to the educator to determine how this wealth of new information will best be translated. The translational task is not easy; it is full of pitfalls. While the scientist reports the results of an experiment, drawing conclusions from those results is the challenge as we know all too well when contending with the often contradictory findings about healthy diets.

Because neuroscience is such a rich field with information ripe for the picking, educators need to establish what will constitute the standards in their field for evaluating and accepting new teaching methods and curricular adjustments. When the findings of neuroscientists are uncritically transferred to the classroom, students can suffer from the premature and inappropriate application of neuroscientific data. On the other hand, the failure to change our schools in the face of overwhelmingly clear data is equally remiss. And indeed, there are areas where the data is clear such as the beneficial effects of physical education on scholastic performance, the ability to acquire a second language at an early age, and the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on academic performance.

We hope this online community will lead to more collaborations between educators and neuroscientists to promote new research in schools, new ideas toward learning, and a sharing of science-based strategies so no child is left behind. "

Quoted from the Learning and the Brain Presentation Manual: Public Information Resources, Inc., A Partner of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives' Brain Awareness Week Campaing. WWW.EDUPR.COM
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2005, 09:01 PM   #123
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Mirror Neurons and learning.....

Mirror neurons....is this true? Very interesting....
Retrieved ll/11/05 from the internet.
URL: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/science.../3204/i01.html

Enjoy,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2005, 07:39 PM   #124
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be smart and teach students to learn.

I have been trying to use a number of fancy learning techniques in learning to motivate my students. It is difficult. I know that several of my graduate masters degree students in both education and psychology are part of TEACHING-THE-BRAIN FORUM which is good.

The best thing that I can do as a teacher is to manifest my very sincere interests in learning and instill motivation. You can tell when a student is motivated, they light up like a candle. A motivated student with knowledge will continue to seek knowledge and compound enthusiasm and motivation ten fold. Many of my student from last term continually tell me that they cannot pass up any article they see about education and the brain....

Think about it. We have a great possibility to change the motivation and receptiveness of our students for life. They will then push us to help them find knowledge. I know it.
Best,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-11-2005, 06:45 PM   #125
segarama
Senior Member
 
segarama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 125
Educators must be experts in teaching learning.

Well, as we have talked before nondeclarative or implicit memory and learning is nonconscious and cannot be retrieved as per declarative memory, learning ie. facts etc. When retrieving nonconscious memory or learning, should not the retrieving be the same as the learning or essentially motor...i.e. riding a bike, swimming etc. .....My students are taking their mid-term exam at home for Thanksgiving week...so they can travel to be with family etc....Now one of my students has the option of writing or word processing his mid term exam or 'painting his mid term exam with water or oils to bring out any nondeclarative learning assessment that he finds profoundly unconscious'....it will be fun to see what he comes up with.
Best,
Rob
segarama is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Go Back  Teach-the-Brain > Teach-the-Brain > How the Brain Learns


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 2008 - 2015 Teach-the-Brain All Rights Reserved